St. Patrick’s Day

by Ann B.


Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Santa Fe! The staff at the library wish you a lovely day full of friends, family, maybe some yummy treats, and, of course, a few good books.

Some of us got into the spirit of the day as well. Enjoy the pictures of staff showing off their spot of green. And, don’t worry, no pinching is allowed for the lack of green-ness!


Cookbooks

Kevin Dundon’s modern Irish food : more than 100 recipes for easy comfort food by Kevin Dundon. These recipes look amazing. I’ve made soda bread a few times . . . and now I have to make more.

Real Irish food : 150 classic recipes from the old country by David Bowers. “Real Irish food is brown soda bread so moist it barely needs the yolk-yellow butter; fragrant apple tarts with tender, golden crusts; rich stews redolent of meaty gravy and sweet carrots; crisp-edged potato cakes flipped hot from a skillet directly onto the plate. Forget meatloaf or mac and cheese–this stuff is the original comfort food.” While there is no way I will ever give up mac and cheese (especially if it’s homemade), apple tarts are always welcome.

An Irish country cookbook by Patrick Taylor. If you’re a fan of Taylor’s Irish County series, this cookbook is for you. Not only does it have 150+ recipes, it also includes 10 short stories featuring his characters.

Biographies

The Immortal Irishman: the Irish revolutionary who became an American hero by Timothy Egan. “From the National Book Award-winning and best-selling author Timothy Egan comes the epic story of one of the most fascinating and colorful Irishman in nineteenth-century America. The Irish-American story, with all its twists and triumphs, is told through the improbable life of one man. A dashing young orator during the Great Famine of the 1840s, in which a million of his Irish countrymen died, Thomas Francis Meagher led a failed uprising against British rule, for which he was banished to a Tasmanian prison colony. He escaped and six months later was heralded in the streets of New York — the revolutionary hero, back from the dead, at the dawn of the great Irish immigration to America.”

Angela’s ashes: a memoir by Frank McCourt. “Angela’s Ashes , imbued on every page with Frank McCourt’s astounding humor and compassion, is a glorious book that bears all the marks of a classic. “When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.” So begins the luminous memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent Irish immigrants and raised in the slums of Limerick, Ireland.”

Teacher man: a memoir also by Frank McCourt. “Teacher Man is also an urgent tribute to teachers everywhere. In bold and spirited prose featuring his irreverent wit and heartbreaking honesty, McCourt records the trials, triumphs and surprises he faces in public high schools around New York City. His methods anything but conventional, McCourt creates a lasting impact on his students through imaginative assignments (he instructs one class to write “An Excuse Note from Adam or Eve to God”), singalongs (featuring recipe ingredients as lyrics), and field trips (imagine taking twenty-nine rowdy girls to a movie in Times Square!). McCourt struggles to find his way in the classroom and spends his evenings drinking with writers and dreaming of one day putting his own story to paper.”

My father left me Ireland : an American son’s search for home by Michael Brendan Dougherty. “The child of an Irish man and an Irish-American woman who split up soon after he was born, Michael Brendan Dougherty grew up with an acute sense of absence. He loved his mother but longed for his father, who only occasionally returned from Ireland for visits. He was happy enough in America, but desperately wanted the sense of cultural belonging that his Irish half-siblings seemed to enjoy . . . [H]e began to study Gaelic. He buried himself in Irish history and learned old songs to sing to his daughter. Most significantly, he began writing letters to his father about what he remembered, what he missed, and what he longed for, realizing along the way that his longings were shared by many of his generation. These letters would become this book. Many Americans today, of all backgrounds, lack a clear sense of cultural heritage or even a vocabulary for expressing this lack. And as the national conversation about identity becomes increasingly polarized, people tend to avoid talking about their roots altogether. In these deeply felt and fascinating letters, Dougherty offers a new way for all of us to think about who we are, where we came from, and where we’re going.”

Fiction

St. Patrick’s Day murder: a Lucy Stone mystery by Leslie Meier. Something slightly more light-hearted. . .

The ninth hour by Alice McDermott. “– a powerfully affecting story spanning the twentieth century of a widow and her daughter and the nuns who serve their Irish-American community in Brooklyn.”

Until the next time: a novel by Kevin Fox. “For Sean Corrigan the past is simply what happened yesterday, until his twenty-first birthday, when he is given a journal left him by his father’s brother Michael–a man he had not known existed. The journal, kept after his uncle fled from New York City to Ireland to escape prosecution for a murder he did not commit, draws Sean into a hunt for the truth about Michael’s fate. Sean too leaves New York for Ireland, where he is caught up in the lives of people who not only know all about Michael Corrigan but have a score to settle.”


I hope you enjoyed this quick list of Irish flavored books! Maybe you’ve been to Ireland, want to go to Ireland, or just want to cook some Irish food (which you can share with us), make sure you explore everything Irish. You can find more on our online catalog, santafelibrary.org.

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